In part 2 of the “Inside Look of a Locker Room,” I left off with applying Vaseline to the fighters face, ears, and nose. After the fighters have been “greased,” it will be time for them to glove up. The promoter supplies the gloves and the Boxing Commission inspects them

It's important to know not only how to tape up the boxers hands, but how to lace up his forearm.

It’s important to know not only how to tape up the boxers hands, but how to lace up his forearm.

prior to them being placed into the fighter’s locker room.  I have had fighters with giant-sized hands and fighters with little hands – both need a different type of “gloving up.”  When wrapping the fighters hand it is important to be mindful of hand size; not too much wrap or the hand will not fit in the glove. And not too little wrap or the fighter’s hand will be hurt during the fight. 

The forearm of the fighter also plays a factor in how you lace the glove. Andy Kolle, Gary Eyer, and Al Sands all have very long forearms, and they need a tight lace. R.J. Laase and Andson Griggs have short, muscular forearms and their lace needs to be firm but not too tight or the blood flow will be cut off to the hands. This will cause their hands will become numb, not allowing them to make a hard fist when punching their opponent. 

It's important to realize the difference between Grand and Reyes gloves.

It’s important to realize the difference between Grand and Reyes gloves.

Not all gloves are the same type; it is very important that the Fighter and his corner men are aware of this. Reyes Gloves protect the fighter’s hands but do a terrible job protecting the fighter from getting cut or hurt. Grant Gloves protect the hands and the head and I prefer these gloves for my fighters. The glove type can be negotiated prior to a fight by each fighter’s team.

When the fighter has been wrapped and gloved properly they will want to test the wrap and gloves by “hitting mitts.” I will go over this next time.